Romance Fiction Based On A True Story Is A Wonderful Read!

According to the media, women around the world have come out of the closet and now are openly devouring erotica books, thanks to the 50 Shades of Grey series. Are women no longer satisfied with the romance and sensual love described in chick-lit and hen-lit books? Or do all contemporary romance authors have to include explicit sex scenes in their novels to create a best seller? The success of Erotica fiction emerging into mainstream literature is like all new ideas: when the idea emerges, the general consensus is that it will never work. Once the idea gains some traction, people think it may work. Once it is a success, people say they knew it would be a success and ask themselves why they didnAc€â„ct think of it first. After general acceptance, and the inevitable copycats, the idea then blends into our societal beliefs. Has there always been erotic fiction? Yes. It just took the right author to create a novel with enough romance and erotica to break through into the huge mainstream romance fiction market.

Remember Shania Twain? She was a solid country artist who released an album called Come on Over? and successfully crossed over to the mainstream pop charts, paving the way for so many artists today like Carrie Underwood and Taylor Swift and bringing country music to a whole world of new fans. So what do women readers actually think about this new crossover genre? There are some women who love the books and will now seek out further erotica.

Others found it interesting, and may try out a few new toys in the bedroom, but thatAc€â„cs the extent of their experimentation. Others read a few chapters because they want to find out what all the hype is about, then feel that it crosses and line and won’t even finish the first book, let alone the series. There is something so beautiful and pure about romance. All women are fed on a diet of Disney fairytale princesses as little girls. We all want to grow up and be swept off our feet and taken away to a castle so we can live happily ever after.

Real life more often than not proves to be anything but a fairytale, but somehow we all still long to be romanced, cherished and treated like princesses. Reading contemporary romance fiction is escape for us grown women. ItAc€â„cs a place where we can leave all the stresses and problems in our own lives, and go through the highs and lows of fictional characters who get their man and dependably do get a happily ever after. What better way to spend a holiday than reading a romance novel by the pool, knowing there will be a happy ending? There’s no doubt Erotic fiction is here to stay, but Romance Fiction is far from dead.

Has there always been erotic fiction? Yes. It just took the right author to create a “crossover” novel with enough romance and erotica to break through into the huge mainstream romance fiction market. Remember Shania Twain? She was a solid country artist who released an album called “Come on Over” and successfully crossed over to the mainstream pop charts, paving the way for so many artists today like Carrie Underwood and Taylor Swift and bringing country music to a whole world of new fans. So what do women readers actually think about this new crossover genre? There are some women who love the books and will now seek out further erotica. Others found it interesting, and may try out a few new toys in the bedroom, but that’s the extent of their experimentation. Others read a few chapters because they want to find out what all the hype is about, then feel that it crosses and line and won’t even finish the first book, let alone the series.

Interestingly enough, the Harlequin romance novel began with a man; not a tall, dark stranger of the novel’s pages, but a Canadian businessman eager to break into publishing. Harlequin was founded in 1949 by Richard Bonnycastle and immediately set about publishing books in a wide array of genres popular in the day – such as mysteries and Westerns. It was not until the late 1950s, when Harlequin acquired Mills & Boon a British romance publisher – that Harlequin made its first foray into the romance novel industry. But by the mid-1960s Harlequin had made a decision to focus solely on the publication of the Harlequin romance fiction novel based on the enormous popularity of the books (and a not-so-gentle nudging from Bonnycastle’s wife Mary).

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